Renting/letting jargon – A-Z

The property world is full of words and expressions that may be unfamiliar to anyone who is not regularly letting or renting a home.

This guide will help to shed light on what they all mean.

Absent Landlord
A landlord described as absent is one who cannot be contacted. If the lessees wish to create a Right To Manage Company but are unable to contact the landlord, they are free to make a legal application to acquire the right to manage.

Administration Fee
A payment which is charged to cover the costs of processing a property rental application. This is paid by the tenant and will be taken from the initial monies once the tenancy starts.

Agreement Fee
A payment which is charged to cover the costs of drawing up a tenancy agreement. This is usually shared between the landlord and tenant.

ARLA Propertymark
The Association of Residential Letting Agents, the UK’s foremost professional body for letting agents.

Assured Shorthold Tenancy (AST)
A widely used rental agreement where the tenant is an individual and net rent does not exceed £25,000 a year. It covers a fixed period, so both parties know the date the property will be vacated.

Break Clause
A clause sometimes agreed between the landlord and tenant to be inserted in a fixed term agreement, typically if the initial fixed term is for a year or more. A break clause will usually allow either landlord or tenant to give written notice after a particular date or period of the tenancy in order to end the tenancy earlier than the original fixed term.

Credit Search References
References requested for a tenant applying to take up rented accommodation. Many agents and individual landlords use external companies who will contact the applicant’s employer, landlord and check the tenant’s credit history, providing a report on their financial suitability to rent.

Deposit
A monetary sum held by the landlord or agent for security against damage to a property or a breach of the tenancy terms. This is usually the equivalent to six weeks’ rent but may vary. If the deposit is for an Assured Shorthold Tenancy (AST), then it must be protected by one of the approved tenancy deposit protection schemes.

Dilapidations
Items that have been damaged during a tenancy. The tenant is usually responsible for the cost of repair or replacement.

EPC
The Energy Performance Certificate (EPC) shows the energy efficiency and carbon emissions of a property and gives an indication of the fuel bills. It is displayed as two graphs, the energy efficiency and environmental impact of the property. Each is graded from A (the best) to G (the worst).

sale is binding and no terms may be altered.

Fixtures and Fittings
Items usually provided in a letting that may include curtains, carpets, blinds, light fittings, kitchen units and appliances. In some cases it may also include furniture. It is advisable to check what is provided and not to assume that items will be provided.

Gas Safety Record
A certificate that states all gas appliances, pipework and flues are safe. It is a legal requirement for all landlords and must be provided every year by a Gas Safe registered engineer after a safety check.

Inventory
A list of the contents of a rental property. The inventory will note the condition of items and will form the basis of a dilapidation report at the end of the tenancy. It often includes photographs of specific items and existing damage/defects.

Lease
The legal document governing the occupation by the tenant of a premises for a specific length of time. At the end of the period the property reverts to the owner.

Listed Building
Buildings of special architectural or historic interest. A listed building may carry certain obligations and restrictions governing its use, repair, and maintenance.

Maintenance Charge or Service Charge
Many leasehold properties (especially flats) are subject to such a charge which pays for items such as the insurance and maintenance of the building.

Maisonette
A flat with its own private entrance.

Multiple Agent Instructions
Where more than one letting agency firm is instructed by a landlord to offer a property to rent.

The Property Ombudsman
The Property Ombudsman offers a free and independent service for resolving disputes between sales and letting agents, which are members of The Property Ombudsman, and buyers/sellers of residential property in the UK.

Sole Agent
Where only one letting agency firm is instructed by a landlord to offer a property to rent.

Tenancy
Possession of a property by a tenant under the terms of a lease.

Tenancy Agreement
The legal agreement governing the occupation of a property by a tenant.

Tenancy Deposit Scheme (TDS)
An insurance-based scheme run by The Dispute Service Ltd. for the protection of tenancy deposits and the resolution of disputes between landlords, agents and tenants concerning the return of deposits at the end of a tenancy. It is one of three schemes approved for tenancy deposit protection.

Tenant
The person who has temporary possession of a property under a lease or tenancy agreement.

Top tips for renting a property

The private rental sector of the UK property market has grown dramatically since the late 1990’s and the growth is predicted to continue.

According to the Office of National Statistics, 36% of households in England and Wales were rented rather than owner-occupied in 2011.

Being a tenant is widely accepted as a viable alternative to home ownership, particularly among those who may not yet be willing or able to consider buying a permanent home. Renting a property should be an enjoyable experience and for those who are new to the process, On The Market have put together the following top tips for renting a property.

Preparing your finances
Decide how much you can reasonably afford to pay in rent each month. Take into account your general costs of living and the fact that you will be paying Council Tax as well as fuel bills, contents insurance, TV licence and broadband. In addition, you will need to budget at least six weeks’ rent as the amount to be put down as security deposit for the length of the tenancy.

Finding a suitable property to rent
Search for properties in areas that you want to live in and create a shortlist of potentials to go and look at. Remember that the rental market is usually fast-moving and that good properties in popular areas don’t stay on the market for very long. If you see something that may suit your needs, get your skates on and quickly go and see it. Get in touch with the letting agents and register to receive alerts when new places come available. Many letting agents belong to industry bodies such as the ARLA Propertymark (formally the Association of Residential Lettings Agents) or the National Approved Letting Scheme (NALS). This can provide some peace of mind to tenants that they will be dealt with in a professional manner.

Asking questions
When you find a property that you would like to rent, you will most probably have read about it online or in an agent’s printed details. You will have seen only basic information, so if there is anything that is unclear or not stated don’t be afraid to ask questions. For example, check who is responsible for maintaining the garden, and whether there are any restrictions concerning pets or smoking in the premises. If you clear such questions at the earliest stage you won’t waste money applying to rent an unsuitable property. Don’t hesitate to ask the letting agent for a list of all the charges that you may incur throughout the process of applying to rent the property.

The tenancy agreement
Assuming you pass the checks and referencing process, the agent will draw up an Assured Shorthold Tenancy agreement for signing by you and the landlord. Read the agreement very carefully before signing and if you are unsure of anything don’t hesitate to ask for clarification. The tenancy agreement is a legal document and binds you and the landlord to the terms within it. Make sure they are in accordance with your understanding.

The deposit
You will be required to pay a security deposit that will be held by the agent on behalf of the landlord for the duration of the tenancy. Its purpose is to provide the landlord with compensation if you damage the property or its contents. Fair wear and tear is excluded from these dilapidations. All deposits in assured shorthold tenancies must be registered with one of the government-approved tenancy deposit schemes that guarantees no-one can run off with the money. The deposit scheme will also provide a dispute resolution service if, at the end of the tenancy, you cannot agree the amount charged by the landlord or their agent for the dilapidations.

Inventories
Even if the property is being let unfurnished, it is really important to have a properly prepared and comprehensively detailed inventory, which is carefully reviewed and signed by tenant and landlord. It will list any existing faults in the property such as areas of damaged decoration, marks on carpets or chips in bath enamel. This ensures that when the dilapidations are assessed at the end of the tenancy you will not be charged for those that were in the property when you took it over. A good inventory will include photographs of such faults.

Paying the rent
You will probably be paying the monthly rent by standing order to the landlord or their agent. Always ensure that rent is paid on time and in full. Non-payment of rent is a serious matter that can end up in court. If there is any problem with the property, do not withhold payment of the rent. Such an action is guaranteed to make resolution all the more difficult and puts you in breach of the terms of the tenancy agreement. It can also show up in future referencing checks and might cause problems if you come to rent another property.

At the end of the tenancy
When the tenancy period is nearing its end, you can ask if the landlord will agree to renew the tenancy (the amount of the rent may change and there may be some administration charges to pay) or you can leave the property. Arrange to move out by the agreed time on the agreed day. Make sure the property is clean and tidy and in at least the same condition as when you moved in. On the moving day, the inventory should be checked at the property by the landlord or their agent, with you in attendance, and it should be signed off by you as correct before you vacate. Take a note of the meter readings for gas and electricity and apply for final billing. Don’t forget to arrange with Royal Mail to redirect mail to your new address (ensure the redirection is specifically for mail in your name).

Repaying your deposit
Shortly after you move out, you will receive an account from the landlord or their agent detailing the charges for dilapidations, if any, that you agreed when the inventory was reviewed during the check-out. Providing you agree the amounts, the balance of your deposit should be returned without delay.

If you are looking to rent in the North Birmingham area, please call our Lettings Hub on 0121 308 7676 to start your rental journey with Paul Carr Residential Lettings.

We are committed to making the application process and your tenancy as stress free as possible.

Are you thinking of letting out your property? Then you may want to read on … this is great news for you!

Figures from the Association of Residential Letting Agents, now formally known as ARLA Propertymark, reveal that there has been a surge in demand for rental accommodation since the New Year.

Demand for rental accommodation has risen by 10 per cent in the last 12 months alone and demand is far outstripping supply.

Paul Carr Residential Lettings
The dedicated team at Paul Carr Residential Lettings, with over 170 years’ of combined experience between them, are well-equipped to deal with all aspects and challenges of letting your property.

Our specialist division is dedicated to the letting and management of properties in the North Birmingham are, encompassing Sutton Coldfield, Great Barr, Aldridge, Walsall, Lichfield and Burntwood.

What next?
If you are an individual looking to invest in a property to let, or you are already a landlord, we aim to match your requirements and deliver a service which is second-to-none. This service includes working with you to protect your property and maximise the return from your investment.

We operate through a dedicated lettings hub, incorporating our comprehensive property management service. Additionally, we provide marketing support through our network of sales division branches, making us accessible and easy to do business with.

We are committed to making the letting process as stress-free as possible and, with our excellent services, we can assure you that we are the team you can trust.

Contact us on 0121 308 7676 or visit our website and start your Paul Carr Lettings journey today.

NAEA and ARLA announce launch of Propertymark

A new stamp of approval for the industry, Propertymark, was launched by NAEA and ARLA earlier this year, largely taking the place of the National Federation of Property Professionals brand.

The National Federation of Property Professionals Awarding Body has become Propertymark Qualifications, with successful candidates receiving Propertymark Qualifications certificates from the beginning of March.

In their official launch statement, NAEA and ARLA said:

“Having listened to our members, and given the significant challenges the industry is facing, it is clear, now more than ever before, the public needs far better understanding of how to choose a property agent that has the consumer’s interest at heart.”

The new focus unifies the two organisations as ARLA Propertymark and NAEA Propertymark.

Propertymark is a stamp of approval for consumers when they seek professional property expertise in buying, selling, renting, leasing or valuing a property. It offers the highest standards and qualifications among property professionals.

Paul Carr Lettings are proud members of ARLA Propertymark. Mark Bentley, Director of Paul Carr Exclusive & Rural Homes, is the Vice President of the NAEA and will become President Elect later in 2017.